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India’s Pakistan Conundrum: Managing a Complex Relationship

ISBN

Publisher

Imprint

Year Published

Print Length

Format

SKU

9780367643171
Routledge
NA
2022
224
paperback
2229

350.00

The text looks at key issues of the India-Pakistan relationship, appraises a range of India’s policy options to address the Pakistan conundrum, and proposes a way forward for India’s Pakistan policy. Drawing on the author’s experience of two diplomatic stints in Pakistan, including as the High Commissioner of India, the book offers a unique insider’s perspective on this critical relationship.

About the Author

Sharat Sabharwal joined the Indian Foreign Service in 1975 and over a long diplomatic career, spanning 38 years, held various senior positions in India’s foreign policy set-up. He was Deputy High Commissioner of India to Pakistan (1995-99), Deputy Permanent Representative of India to the UN in Geneva (1999-2002), Ambassador to Uzbekistan (2002-05) and High Commissioner to Pakistan (2009-13). After his retirement from the Foreign Service, he served as Central Information Commissioner from 2013 to 2017. He is currently a Distinguished Fellow with the Ananta Centre, New Delhi, India. He has been commenting on foreign policy issues, notably concerning Pakistan and Afghanistan, in TV discussions and print media.

Description

Historically, the relationship between India and Pakistan has been mired in conflicts, war, and lack of trust. Pakistan has continued to loom large on India’s horizon despite the growing gap between the two countries. This book examines the nature of the Pakistani state, its internal dynamics, and its impact on India.

The text looks at key issues of the India-Pakistan relationship, appraises a range of India’s policy options to address the Pakistan conundrum, and proposes a way forward for India’s Pakistan policy. Drawing on the author’s experience of two diplomatic stints in Pakistan, including as the High Commissioner of India, the book offers a unique insider’s perspective on this critical relationship.

A crucial intervention in diplomatic history and the analysis of India’s Pakistan policy, the book will be of as much interest to the general reader as to scholars and researchers of foreign policy, strategic studies, international relations, South Asia studies, diplomacy, and political science.

Praise for the book

"The India-Pakistan relationship is burdened by layer upon layer of prejudice, hostility and progressively infrequent engagement. If there ever was a need to dispel the stereotypical images that imprison the minds of people in both countries, that need is now more than ever. There is no one more knowledgeable about Pakistan and its political and social dynamics than Sharat Sabharwal who also had the unique distinction of managing the complex relations between the two countries at critical junctures. His fine book 'India’s Pakistan Conundrum' demonstrates that we are dealing with a country which far from being a monolithic entity, has a diversity which needs to be understood and treated with nuance. This is an important book on a critical subject and of immense value to scholars and lay persons alike." Shyam Saran, former Foreign Secretary, Prime Minister’s Special Envoy and Chairman of the National Security Advisory Board "As India celebrates its seventy-fifth year of independence, it is also a moment to reflect on the tragic Partition of the Subcontinent and the unending conflict with Pakistan. Sharat Sabharwal, with his deep diplomatic experience in Pakistan, offers a clear-eyed analysis of what troubles this relationship and the multiple dilemmas that test Delhi's engagement with Islamabad. Amidst mounting political passions that cast a dark shadow over bilateral ties, Sabharwal brings much needed clarity to India's national discourse on Pakistan." C. Raja Mohan, Director, Institute of South Asian Studies, National University of Singapore

India’s Pakistan Conundrum: Managing a Complex Relationship

The text looks at key issues of the India-Pakistan relationship, appraises a range of India’s policy options to address the Pakistan conundrum, and proposes a way forward for India’s Pakistan policy. Drawing on the author’s experience of two diplomatic stints in Pakistan, including as the High Commissioner of India, the book offers a unique insider’s perspective on this critical relationship.

About the Author

Sharat Sabharwal joined the Indian Foreign Service in 1975 and over a long diplomatic career, spanning 38 years, held various senior positions in India’s foreign policy set-up. He was Deputy High Commissioner of India to Pakistan (1995-99), Deputy Permanent Representative of India to the UN in Geneva (1999-2002), Ambassador to Uzbekistan (2002-05) and High Commissioner to Pakistan (2009-13). After his retirement from the Foreign Service, he served as Central Information Commissioner from 2013 to 2017. He is currently a Distinguished Fellow with the Ananta Centre, New Delhi, India. He has been commenting on foreign policy issues, notably concerning Pakistan and Afghanistan, in TV discussions and print media.

Description

Praise for the book

"The India-Pakistan relationship is burdened by layer upon layer of prejudice, hostility and progressively infrequent engagement. If there ever was a need to dispel the stereotypical images that imprison the minds of people in both countries, that need is now more than ever. There is no one more knowledgeable about Pakistan and its political and social dynamics than Sharat Sabharwal who also had the unique distinction of managing the complex relations between the two countries at critical junctures. His fine book 'India’s Pakistan Conundrum' demonstrates that we are dealing with a country which far from being a monolithic entity, has a diversity which needs to be understood and treated with nuance. This is an important book on a critical subject and of immense value to scholars and lay persons alike." Shyam Saran, former Foreign Secretary, Prime Minister’s Special Envoy and Chairman of the National Security Advisory Board "As India celebrates its seventy-fifth year of independence, it is also a moment to reflect on the tragic Partition of the Subcontinent and the unending conflict with Pakistan. Sharat Sabharwal, with his deep diplomatic experience in Pakistan, offers a clear-eyed analysis of what troubles this relationship and the multiple dilemmas that test Delhi's engagement with Islamabad. Amidst mounting political passions that cast a dark shadow over bilateral ties, Sabharwal brings much needed clarity to India's national discourse on Pakistan." C. Raja Mohan, Director, Institute of South Asian Studies, National University of Singapore
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