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The Dragon from the Mountains: The CPEC from Kashgar to Gwadar

300.00

Utilising the contemporary China-Pakistan relationship, economic theory and history, this book evaluates if China can spark Pakistan’s growth.

About the Author

Matthew McCartney is Director of South Asian Studies and Associate Professor in the Political Economy and Human Development of India at the University of Oxford. His two most recent books are Economic Growth and Development: A Comparative Introduction (2015) and Pakistan: The Political Economy of Growth, Stagnation and the State, 1951–2008 (2009).

Description

China has promised to invest more than $60billion in Pakistan, in roads, rail, energy and a deep-water port at Gwadar. This is unprecedented relative to decades of minimal foreign direct investment (FDI) entering Pakistan. This is the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC). Support for CPEC in Pakistan is widespread and encompasses much of academia, the military, the mainstream political leadership, and civil society. Supporters argue that CPEC offers the potential to transform Pakistan and support rapid, equitable and sustainable economic growth. Detractors of CPEC argue that it will more likely tip Pakistan into a dependent debt-relationship with China and that it will facilitate more Chinese imports into Pakistan posing a threat to Pakistan’s industrial base. This book utilises an in-depth understanding of economic change in contemporary China and Pakistan, and economic theory and studies of big infrastructure projects from the contemporary and historical world to evaluate these contrasting views about CPEC.

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The Dragon from the Mountains: The CPEC from Kashgar to Gwadar

Utilising the contemporary China-Pakistan relationship, economic theory and history, this book evaluates if China can spark Pakistan’s growth.

About the Author

Matthew McCartney is Director of South Asian Studies and Associate Professor in the Political Economy and Human Development of India at the University of Oxford. His two most recent books are Economic Growth and Development: A Comparative Introduction (2015) and Pakistan: The Political Economy of Growth, Stagnation and the State, 1951–2008 (2009).

Description

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