Decisive Moments in the History of Islam

ISBN

Publisher

Imprint

Year Published

Print Length

Format

SKU

9781744783983
Kitabee
NA
2022
256 Pages
Paperback
2261

375.00

In stock

Description

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.

Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface.

We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Praise and Reviews

"Decisive Moments in the History of Islam" by Muhammad Abdullah Enan, formerly of the Egyptian Bar and Egyptian Society for Historical Research; originally published in 1940 in Lahore (Pakistan); revised third ed. in 1949; revised fifth ed. in 1974. Written by a Muslim who contended that the pagans living in North Africa were generally `happy' to be informed of the peaceful message of the Prophet Mohammad - as long as they paid their dhimmi jizyah tribute-taxes (p. 22). The author quoted both the English historian Gibbon and the German von Schlegel about the dhimmis' happiness. The author tried to down play the military aspects of the Muslim's `peaceful conquests' by the early Muslim militias (or as the author defined these military campaigns: "the Arab Outburst"), but in a moment of candor the Muslim author gushed that in Oct. 732: "The Muslims captured and pillaged Poitiers [France] and burned its famous cathedral. They then attacked Tours...captured it and destroyed its cathedral...the Berber tribes were anxious to retire with their great spoils...They plundered all its rich churches and monasteries...and carried away innumerable treasures, spoils and captives" (p. 61). The author discusses other various Muslim battles: Constantinople, Crete, Sicily, Sardegna, Corsica, the battle of Manzikert, Hattin, Mansurah, De Joinveill's Memoirs, slavery in the Middle Ages [eight short pages of banal generalities; no discussion from the hadith], the Fall of Toledo and Granada, and bemoans the collapse of Muslim Spain (or as the author titled it: The Fall of the Moorish Civilization). Not really an extensive nor detailed in-depth analysis of the history of the early Muslim era, but probably interesting when it was originally written. If you are already familiar with Islamic history, I don't see this mid-1950s book adding much to a reader's knowledge. Past its prime; stale-dated.

About the Author

Decisive Moments in the History of Islam

Description

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Praise and Reviews

"Decisive Moments in the History of Islam" by Muhammad Abdullah Enan, formerly of the Egyptian Bar and Egyptian Society for Historical Research; originally published in 1940 in Lahore (Pakistan); revised third ed. in 1949; revised fifth ed. in 1974. Written by a Muslim who contended that the pagans living in North Africa were generally `happy' to be informed of the peaceful message of the Prophet Mohammad - as long as they paid their dhimmi jizyah tribute-taxes (p. 22). The author quoted both the English historian Gibbon and the German von Schlegel about the dhimmis' happiness. The author tried to down play the military aspects of the Muslim's `peaceful conquests' by the early Muslim militias (or as the author defined these military campaigns: "the Arab Outburst"), but in a moment of candor the Muslim author gushed that in Oct. 732: "The Muslims captured and pillaged Poitiers [France] and burned its famous cathedral. They then attacked Tours...captured it and destroyed its cathedral...the Berber tribes were anxious to retire with their great spoils...They plundered all its rich churches and monasteries...and carried away innumerable treasures, spoils and captives" (p. 61). The author discusses other various Muslim battles: Constantinople, Crete, Sicily, Sardegna, Corsica, the battle of Manzikert, Hattin, Mansurah, De Joinveill's Memoirs, slavery in the Middle Ages [eight short pages of banal generalities; no discussion from the hadith], the Fall of Toledo and Granada, and bemoans the collapse of Muslim Spain (or as the author titled it: The Fall of the Moorish Civilization). Not really an extensive nor detailed in-depth analysis of the history of the early Muslim era, but probably interesting when it was originally written. If you are already familiar with Islamic history, I don't see this mid-1950s book adding much to a reader's knowledge. Past its prime; stale-dated.

About the Author

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