The Men Who Ruled India

By: Philip Mason

400.00

SKU: 2225 Categories: , Tag:
Print Length
400
ISBN
9788171673612
Publisher
Rupa Publications
Imprint
NA
Year Published
1992
Format
Paperback

About the Author

He is best known for his two-volume book on the British Raj, The Men Who Ruled India (written under the pseudonym 'Philip Woodruff', the latter being his mother's maiden name), and his study of the Indian Army, A Matter of Honour (1974).

Description

There comes a time in a man’s life when he may well stand back and consider what he has built, planted, written or begotten and whether it was worth doing. If in such a mood the English—and by that I mean all those who speak English: Chaucer and Drake, Milton and Marlborough, Clive and Hastings, belong to us all—if the English look back on their varied history, the long connection with India will be an achievement that cannot be ignored. It is too soon to say if it will last. But though the political structure may change to something unrecognizable, it is hard to believe that the impress of English ways, of thinking will vanish altogether. And the achievement itself, whatever the future holds, is surely a matter for pride.

There are many ways of looking at it.

Praise for the book

The heart of one man will beat faster—though perhaps against his will—to remember how a handful of his countrymen mastered and ruled so many millions by the sword, by diplomacy, above all by a stubborn tenacity of purpose. To another, the main matter for pride will be that so few among so many had so slight a need for force, that so often the district officer really was at heart what the villagers called him in their petitions, the father and mother of his people. To another again it will seem that the years of renunciation with which the story ends are the finest in the long record. For more than three centuries the effort was sustained. It was an effort in which two parts combined, as brain and muscle join in the sweep of a scythe. There was the will of the people of England expressed imperfectly by the Crown, by Parliament, by the Court of Directors of the East India Company;
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The Men Who Ruled India

The man who ruled India is a masterly distillation of Philip Mason’s two classics, The Founders and The Guardians which were written soon after British withdrawal from the sub continent, when the sight and sound and smells of an area the size of Europe were still fresh in memory.

About the Author

He is best known for his two-volume book on the British Raj, The Men Who Ruled India (written under the pseudonym 'Philip Woodruff', the latter being his mother's maiden name), and his study of the Indian Army, A Matter of Honour (1974).

Description

There comes a time in a man’s life when he may well stand back and consider what he has built, planted, written or begotten and whether it was worth doing. If in such a mood the English—and by that I mean all those who speak English: Chaucer and Drake, Milton and Marlborough, Clive and Hastings, belong to us all—if the English look back on their varied history, the long connection with India will be an achievement that cannot be ignored. It is too soon to say if it will last. But though the political structure may change to something unrecognizable, it is hard to believe that the impress of English ways, of thinking will vanish altogether. And the achievement itself, whatever the future holds, is surely a matter for pride.

There are many ways of looking at it.

Praise for the book

The heart of one man will beat faster—though perhaps against his will—to remember how a handful of his countrymen mastered and ruled so many millions by the sword, by diplomacy, above all by a stubborn tenacity of purpose. To another, the main matter for pride will be that so few among so many had so slight a need for force, that so often the district officer really was at heart what the villagers called him in their petitions, the father and mother of his people. To another again it will seem that the years of renunciation with which the story ends are the finest in the long record. For more than three centuries the effort was sustained. It was an effort in which two parts combined, as brain and muscle join in the sweep of a scythe. There was the will of the people of England expressed imperfectly by the Crown, by Parliament, by the Court of Directors of the East India Company;
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